Maps without Alaska

Ask me anything   Submit   A compendium of maps which overlook our 49th state.

hulu:

From the Pacific Northwest to the sunny beaches of Florida, this country has something to offer just about anyone. The best way to see it all? Take a TV road trip and binge on full seasons of these awesome TV shows - all on Hulu.

Northern Exposure, duh.

hulu:

From the Pacific Northwest to the sunny beaches of Florida, this country has something to offer just about anyone. The best way to see it all? Take a TV road trip and binge on full seasons of these awesome TV shows - all on Hulu.

Northern Exposure, duh.

— 2 weeks ago with 67 notes
worldnewsmedia:

Yellowstone Volcano Eruption: Report Claims That US Has Contingency Deal With Brazil, Australia
If the Yellowstone supervolcano erupts then millions of U.S. citizens could end up in Brazil, Australia, or Argentina.
That’s according to the South African news website Praag, which said that the African National Congress was offered $10 billion a year for 10 years if it would build temporary housing for Americans in case of an eruption.
The potential eruption of the supervolcano, one of the biggest in the world, has been a hot topic ever since videos of animals allegedly fleeing the area before an earthquake were posted online. Although the veracity of the claims haven’t been backed up, dozens of bloggers and others have been trying to figure out what, if anything, is going on.
One of the latest theories is that the U.S. Geological Service and its partners, which keep an eye on the caldera, are hiding data from the public.
The Praag article says that the South African government fears that placing so many Americans in South Africa could dramatically change the country.
“South Africa will not be part of the plan, because there is a risk that millions of white Americans could be sent to South Africa in an emergency situation and that this would pose a risk to black national culture identity,” Dr. Siph Matwetwe, spokesman for the Department of Foreign Affairs, is quoted as saying.
“We have our own challenges, even if there is enough housing and infrastructure available, it will destabilize the country and may even bring back apartheid.”
The gigantic volcano in Yellowstone has erupted three times over the last two million years, covering a huge area of surrounding land. Maps from educational institutions and government officials project that up to 17 states could be fully or partially impacted if the volcano erupted again. The far south of Canada could also get hit, as well as the far north of Mexico.
Scientists aren’t sure when it will erupt next, although many have sought to assure the public that it probably won’t for a while. In reality, the volcano could erupt at any time, though officials would in theory be able to detect an impending eruption and alert Americans to the threat.
Source

Kinda psyched we’re not on this map. 

worldnewsmedia:

Yellowstone Volcano Eruption: Report Claims That US Has Contingency Deal With Brazil, Australia

If the Yellowstone supervolcano erupts then millions of U.S. citizens could end up in Brazil, Australia, or Argentina.

That’s according to the South African news website Praag, which said that the African National Congress was offered $10 billion a year for 10 years if it would build temporary housing for Americans in case of an eruption.

The potential eruption of the supervolcano, one of the biggest in the world, has been a hot topic ever since videos of animals allegedly fleeing the area before an earthquake were posted online. Although the veracity of the claims haven’t been backed up, dozens of bloggers and others have been trying to figure out what, if anything, is going on.

One of the latest theories is that the U.S. Geological Service and its partners, which keep an eye on the caldera, are hiding data from the public.

The Praag article says that the South African government fears that placing so many Americans in South Africa could dramatically change the country.

“South Africa will not be part of the plan, because there is a risk that millions of white Americans could be sent to South Africa in an emergency situation and that this would pose a risk to black national culture identity,” Dr. Siph Matwetwe, spokesman for the Department of Foreign Affairs, is quoted as saying.

“We have our own challenges, even if there is enough housing and infrastructure available, it will destabilize the country and may even bring back apartheid.”

The gigantic volcano in Yellowstone has erupted three times over the last two million years, covering a huge area of surrounding land. Maps from educational institutions and government officials project that up to 17 states could be fully or partially impacted if the volcano erupted again. The far south of Canada could also get hit, as well as the far north of Mexico.

Scientists aren’t sure when it will erupt next, although many have sought to assure the public that it probably won’t for a while. In reality, the volcano could erupt at any time, though officials would in theory be able to detect an impending eruption and alert Americans to the threat.

Source

Kinda psyched we’re not on this map. 

(via 2087)

— 2 months ago with 213 notes
newsweek:

These are the top 10 cable companies across the country.

Alaska has GCI. Woo. 

newsweek:

These are the top 10 cable companies across the country.

Alaska has GCI. Woo. 

— 5 months ago with 68 notes
"The relentless correcting of maps may seem like a petty act of a senator with too much time on his hands. But this isn’t just a lark, it’s a survival technique. Survival to keep Alaska in the American imagination and thus never completely out of sight from the country’s businessmen and appropriators."

Mark Begich fights to put Alaska back on the map - The Washington Post

Mark Begich, hero to the Maps Without Alaska blog.

— 6 months ago with 2 notes
mapsontheweb:

Where Americans Get Enough Exercise

It is probably just as well that we are not on this map. 

mapsontheweb:

Where Americans Get Enough Exercise

It is probably just as well that we are not on this map. 

(via errthng)

— 6 months ago with 97 notes
mapiverse:

American diversity map by Langston Hughes, 1940s.

This map, issued by the Council Against Intolerance in America in 1940, shows the ethnic groups living in the United States, offering a picture of their geographical locations, typical employment, and religious commitments.

Source: Slate

In this map’s defense, we were only a territory, and wouldn’t be a state for another 19 years. 

mapiverse:

American diversity map by Langston Hughes, 1940s.

This map, issued by the Council Against Intolerance in America in 1940, shows the ethnic groups living in the United States, offering a picture of their geographical locations, typical employment, and religious commitments.

Source: Slate

In this map’s defense, we were only a territory, and wouldn’t be a state for another 19 years. 

(via fuckyeahcartography)

— 6 months ago with 68 notes
laughingsquid:

Map of the Population Distribution of the United States Measured in Canadas

There’s a good joke to be made here about the ironies of geography, and Alaska’s low population relative to Canada, but I’m too dumb to make it. 

laughingsquid:

Map of the Population Distribution of the United States Measured in Canadas

There’s a good joke to be made here about the ironies of geography, and Alaska’s low population relative to Canada, but I’m too dumb to make it. 

— 6 months ago with 938 notes
theatlantic:

What You Get When 30 People Draw a World Map From Memory

Maps, as I’ve written before, are inherently subjective—no matter how detailed or scientific, they reflect our worldview and the age in which we’re living, not to mention the difficulty of projecting a spherical globe onto a plane surface. Now compound these challenges by asking 30 people to sketch a map of the world from memory. What would you get?
In the summer of 2012, Zak Ziebell, now a 17-year-old high school senior in San Antonio, did just that.
Read more. [Image: Zak Ziebell]


SO basically the entire world forgets about us. Awesome. 

theatlantic:

What You Get When 30 People Draw a World Map From Memory

Maps, as I’ve written before, are inherently subjective—no matter how detailed or scientific, they reflect our worldview and the age in which we’re living, not to mention the difficulty of projecting a spherical globe onto a plane surface. Now compound these challenges by asking 30 people to sketch a map of the world from memory. What would you get?

In the summer of 2012, Zak Ziebell, now a 17-year-old high school senior in San Antonio, did just that.

Read more. [Image: Zak Ziebell]

SO basically the entire world forgets about us. Awesome. 

(via npr)

— 6 months ago with 1305 notes

creature-a:

#A Map of the Weirdest Sex Laws in the United States (X)

No weird sex laws here, nosiree.

(via fuckyeahcartography)

— 6 months ago with 1329 notes